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Thursday, July 14, 2005

The Casual Critic — Reaction to Rick Santorum's It Takes a Family

The headline grabbed me better than any I've seen in years: "Senator's book puts blame on Liberalism." Damn straight, baby! While I haven't yet read Senator Rick Santorum's It Takes a Family, I think it's about time somebody in this country stood up and said what millions are feeling.

In the Inquirer story I read, Santorum is criticized by Robert P. Casey, Jr., and the Democratic Party for having the nerve to suggest that there are too many two-income families. The story said he questions why women find a career more gratifying than staying at home to raise the kids, and wrote, "Here, we can thank the influence of radical feminism." The PA state Democratic Party is quoted as saying "every woman in Pennsylvania should be offended." (I guess the Party all gathered to offer the reply in unison.) Casey is quoted as saying Santorum "is out of step with reality."

Why, exactly, should every woman in Pennsylvania be offended? Is it possible that the only real purpose of the statement was to start the campaign to win Santorum's seat in the next election? Skipping the fact that everything most politicians say is about advancing their careers, let's ask the real question. Why should any woman be offended? In fact, let's go even further. Why is it that whenever anyone dare not pussy-foot around an issue, every liberal-minded anything cries foul?

I don't care about Rick Santorum, but I do care about the seemingly endless stream of liberal garbage that floods the media on a daily basis. Everybody and their brother will tell you how the world's headed to hell in a handbag, but question one thing, try to even comment on one problem that might need fixing, and somebody somewhere is getting media coverage bitching about it. We've become so absurdly politically correct that we are now paralyzed to do, or even say, anything in this country for fear of offending someone.

Isn't it possible that Santorum's view on two-income families is a compliment to women? Most would agree that kids are more troubled today than ever. The suggestion that kids are too unsupervised after school hours, giving them plenty of opportunity to get into trouble, has been made plenty of times. After-school programs don't seem to be reversing this trend. Santorum, as I read it in the paper, merely seems to suggest that mothers might be more suited to the job of guiding their children down productive paths than a government program. Yet, the liberals howl.

I'm not suggesting that the liberal and/or minority view shouldn't be heard. I often share the minority view. My problem is that when the so-called conservative view is expressed, the "story" is always about the reaction to that view. It's as though the conservative, and often the majority, is forced to remain silent or be portrayed as the evil oppressor.

Take the issue of making English our national language. Instead of being a relatively small statement that affirms that we are, in fact, a united group of people in this country, it has become a political hot potato that no one wants to touch. Opponents come up with asinine arguments centered around our country being built upon ideals of freedom, and that our history is one of being "a melting pot." So, let's dispose with common sense, and spend more tax dollars creating Spanish-speaking (or any other language-based) classrooms in public schools to educate the children of immigrants who are too lazy to learn the language of the nation they immigrated to for a better life. In fact, let's require every sign, every public document, website, and whatever else to be printed in every freakin' language ever uttered so no one's ever left out.

School prayer is another hot-button issue these days. Encouraging kids to take a quiet moment of prayer is an affront to people who want a total separation of church and state. As always they pick apart the words of our Forefathers and claim there should never be any mention of God in public places. Maybe they should read the opening sentence of the Declaration of Independence:

When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.


How can there be any doubt that at the very least we, in fact, have the right even in public places to pray, and to offer that right to children? We invoked the name of God in the first sentence of our declaration that we were an independent country.

The list goes on and on. Let's not do background checks on potential gun owners because our Constitution gives us the right to bear arms. Forget that semi-automatics couldn't have ever been dreamed of in colonial days, and that the Framers thought of the Constitution as a living document, allowing for adjustments to change with the times when necessary exactly like the one needed to control guns.

Then, of course, there’s the flag burning issue. Somehow our own principles of freedom allow people to burn the most recognized symbol of our country right here in our own country. Opponents of a law making such an act illegal crow about how it would actually be an affront to our freedoms to ban flag burning. Common sense and our sense of patriotism tell us it's wrong, and those performing the act do it to strike a blow against such feelings, yet liberals cry out that banning it will send us down some slippery slope.

And there we have it. The slippery slope. The rallying cry of every pansy liberal.

Yes, we've all used it. I thought about in the Shiavo case. But why do we have to live in fear of it on every stinkin' issue?

Why can't we say, hey, we can ban flag burning and it won’t lead to Big Brother 'cause we damn well won't let it? Or, just maybe, allowing school prayer won't lead to a state where we all must go to the same (or any) church. And, call me crazy, but maybe a waiting period to buy a gun won't . . . well, I’m not sure how that could possibly lead us down a path of doom, but you get my point.

No, I haven't taken account of every point, some no doubt even valid, involved in the issues I've mentioned. My point is not to offer a thorough look at English as the national language, owning guns, flag burning, separation of church and state, or even Santorum's book. It is, however, my reaction to some of the liberal views that go too far and those who continue to trample the right of others to oppose their views in the name of "freedom" or even "America." When a guy suggests that one solution to society's ills is for mothers with the financial wherewithal to stay home with their kids is called "out of step" and offensive to every woman, something is wrong with our step.

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